Saturday, 20 December 2014

I seldom, if ever, believe the last words people are reported to have said.

 All Saints, Claverley, Shropshire
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This site in Claverley has probably been a place of worship since before Christianity came to Britain. The yew tree outside of the northeast corner of the Church is over 2,500 years old and such trees were commonly planted in sacred places.   
 
 
I seldom, if ever, believe the last words people are reported to have said.
 
Visited - October 2012

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The Cambrian Prince sank 25 miles off Whitby in storm force 10 winds

 St Swithin, Clunbury, Shropshire
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After four consecutive unsuccessful visits to churches west of Craven Arms it was a relief to find some graves worth recording for our survey.
 
 
 The Cambrian Prince sank 25 miles off Whitby in storm force 10 winds on 27th February 1903 with the loss of 19 of the 20 crew. The ship was carrying manganese ingots from Coquimbo, Chile to Middlesbrough.
 
Visited - May 2011

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Blinded in action in 1915.

 Cunnery Road Cemetery, Church Stretton, Shropshire
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Cunnery Road Cemetery has an attractive and helpful noticeboard at the entrance with the most interesting graves clearly identified. Well done to whoever organised this.
 
 
 Blinded in action in 1915. 
 
Visited - April 2011

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Thursday, 18 December 2014

I found it very sad that so many residents were buried in unmarked graves.

 St Michael, Forden, Powys
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Unusually the bell tower is sited at the side of the church rather than at the end.
 
 
The Forden Union workhouse later became Brynhyfryd Hospital and provided care mainly for the elderly. I found it very sad that so many residents were buried in unmarked graves. 
 
Visited - May 2013

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An unusual grave reporting the birth and death of adult twins.

 Market Harborough, Leicestershire
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We found it rather curious that this major cemetery
didn't have a notice board at the entrance.
 
 
 An unusual grave reporting the birth and death of adult twins. 
 
Visited - July 2009

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A slate tomb showing pre-deceased children

St Torney, North Hill, Cornwall 
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We arrived at the church just as a service was ending. We were pleased to see that the churchyard had been well maintained.
 
 
 At the west end of north aisle there is the slate table tomb of Thomas Vincent of Battens (died 1606) and Jane his wife (died 1601) flanked by their 7 daughters and 8 sons. The small skulls above the heads of some of the children show they pre-deceased their parents.
 
 
 Visited - June 2014

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Friday, 12 December 2014

The grave of a murderer.

 St Andrew, Presteigne, Powys, Wales
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This church incorporates some elements of its late-Saxon predecessor on this site. The present building can be traced back to early Norman times, and was extended to its current length in the late 12th century, when a self-standing tower was erected. Another enlargement followed in the 14th century, adding the existing nave and a south aisle which connected the tower to the rest of the building.
 
 
Mary Morgan was a young servant convicted and hanged for killing her newborn child. On 13 April Morgan was hanged, and was buried in what was then unconsecrated ground near the church later that same afternoon. Her public execution attracted large crowds, who watched as she was taken by cart from the gaol to the execution at Gallows Lane. 
 
 
 
Visited - June 2014

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